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Search Results for: epilepsy

Standard Poodle Project: Addison’s and Epilepsy

Please Note:
The buccal swab kit and/or blood sample you submit is for participation in a research study only.
This research does NOT test to verify if your dog does or does not have the disease.
All sample submissions are kept confidential and results for individual dogs will NOT be made available.

 

What is Addison’s Disease (Hypoadrenocorticism)?

A deficient secretion of both glucocorticoids and mineralcorticoids from the adrenal cortex. The cause is unknown, but in most cases, there appears to be an immune mediated destruction of the adrenal gland. Symptoms include inappetance, vomiting, lethargy and weakness. An ACTH stimulation test can be used for diagnosis. The test is an evaluation of the ability of the adrenal gland to secrete cortisol. Affected dogs show low cortisol concentrations, and no increase in cortisol following the ACTH test. Treatment includes fluid therapy, replacement of glucocorticoids and mineralcorticoids, and hormone therapy. The FAQs link will answer many of your questions regarding the study. We appreciate your support and interest in the study.

What is Epilepsy?

A condition involving recurrent seizures, which are convulsions caused by abnormal bursts of electrical activity in the brain. Seizures may last from seconds to minutes, and may include jerking of the limbs, anxiety, salivating, vocalizing, and loss of bodily functions (urinating/defecating).   Epilepsy can be caused by metabolic disorders, infectious diseases, brain injury, toxins, or brain tumors. In dogs, idiopathic (or inherited) epilepsy refers to a genetic seizure condition of unknown cause.  Since a dog with idiopathic epilepsy shows no recognizable abnormalities, it is assumed to be an inherited condition in most breeds and has been demonstrated to be heritable in some breeds.  Treatment of seizures is usually two-fold which includes treatment of the underlying problem (infection, tumor, injury) and reducing or eliminating the seizure episodes with anticonvulsant medication. The FAQs link will answer many of your questions regarding the study.  We appreciate your support and interest in the study.

For detailed information about canine epilepsy and seizures, please visit the following link to Understanding Your Pet’s Epilepsy from Dr. Dennis O’Brien at the University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine.

A Note Regarding Submission of Blood Samples

  • Although we continue to collect DNA from buccal swab samples, newer research technologies prefer DNA extracted from blood samples. Thus, we are seeking blood samples from affected and unaffected dogs. Affected dogs with veterinary diagnosis can be submitted from dogs of any age. We also need samples from dogs over the age of 7 years (the older, the better) who are free from the disease under study.
  • There is no fee for participating in this study although the owner bears the cost of blood collection and shipping of the sample to the laboratory. Some veterinarians may collect and ship samples at no charge for research purposes – please check with your veterinarian. 
  • In the event that your dog’s DNA from the blood sample is used directly in the development of a commercially available diagnostic test developed by this laboratory, the results of the test for that dog will be provided at no cost upon your written request following the availability of that commercial test.
  • Please note UC Davis Campus Holidays and Closures when sending a blood sample.

CGAP Epilepsy Questionnaire for deceased dogs

  • This questionnaire is for dogs from older generations who have never had a DNA sample submitted to the study.
  • Fields with a red asterisks must be completed before your submission will be accepted.
  • Please be sure to select the correct breed from the list.
  • Owner information is required.
  • If you could, please send a copy of your dog’s pedigree with your name to the following address:

Oberbauer Lab
Canine Genetic Analysis Project (CGAP)
Department of Animal Science
University of California
One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616-8521

Epilepsy Questionnaire for deceased dogs

 

 

Understanding Epilepsy

For detailed information about canine epilepsy and seizures, please visit the below link to Understanding Your Pet’s Epilepsy from Dr. Dennis O’Brien at the University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine:

Understanding Your Pet’s Epilepsy

 

 

Epilepsy Project

Breeds under study for this project:
Belgian Tervuren, Belgian Sheepdog, English Mastiff, Giant Schnauzer, Miniature Poodle, Toy Poodle

Please Note:
The buccal swab kit and/or blood sample you submit is for participation in a research study only.
This research does NOT test to verify if your dog does or does not have the disease.
All sample submissions are kept confidential and results for individual dogs will NOT be made available.

 

What is Epilepsy?

A condition involving recurrent seizures, which are convulsions caused by abnormal bursts of electrical activity in the brain. Seizures may last from seconds to minutes, and may include jerking of the limbs, anxiety, salivating, vocalizing, and loss of bodily functions (urinating/defecating).   Epilepsy can be caused by metabolic disorders, infectious diseases, brain injury, toxins, or brain tumors. In dogs, idiopathic (or inherited) epilepsy refers to a genetic seizure condition of unknown cause.  Since a dog with idiopathic epilepsy shows no recognizable abnormalities, it is assumed to be an inherited condition in most breeds and has been demonstrated to be heritable in some breeds.  Treatment of seizures is usually two-fold which includes treatment of the underlying problem (infection, tumor, injury) and reducing or eliminating the seizure episodes with anticonvulsant medication. The FAQs link will answer many of your questions regarding the study.  We appreciate your support and interest in the study.

For detailed information about canine epilepsy and seizures, please visit the following link to Understanding Your Pet’s Epilepsy from Dr. Dennis O’Brien at the University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine.

Genotype Data

If your dog has genotype data in the form of a zip file (tfam/tped files) and you would be willing to send the data to our study, please email the file to jmbelanger@ucdavis.edu Please include a health questionnaire with each dog’s data file submission.  Owners who submit genotyping data are encouraged to submit a DNA sample from their dog(s) so that we may have a DNA sample in our laboratory for more in depth genotyping analysis.

A Note Regarding Submission of Blood Samples

  • Although we continue to collect DNA from buccal swab samples, newer research technologies prefer DNA extracted from blood samples. Thus, we are seeking blood samples from affected and unaffected dogs. Affected dogs with veterinary diagnosis can be submitted from dogs of any age. We also need samples from dogs over the age of 7 years (the older, the better) who are free from the disease under study.
  • There is no fee for participating in this study although the owner bears the cost of blood collection and shipping of the sample to the laboratory. Some veterinarians may collect and ship samples at no charge for research purposes – please check with your veterinarian. 
  • In the event that your dog’s DNA from the blood sample is used directly in the development of a commercially available diagnostic test developed by this laboratory, the results of the test for that dog will be provided at no cost upon your written request following the availability of that commercial test.
  • Please note UC Davis Campus Holidays and Closures when sending a blood sample.
All disease information referenced from:
UC Davis Book of Dogs
A Complete Medical Reference Guide for Dogs and Puppies
by the Faculty and Staff, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis ;
edited by Mordecai Siegal, consulting editor, Jeffrey E. Barlough. 1st ed. New York : HarperCollins Publishers, 1995.

Instructions and Questionnaires for Submitting a Blood Sample

To submit a blood sample for your dog for any of the below projects, the veterinarian of your choice will collect the blood from your dog which you submit along with the downloadable form available below.  Please note that CGAP is not responsible for costs incurred for blood collection and shipping. We require 3-5cc (ml) of whole blood in purple-topped (EDTA) blood tubes. Some veterinarians may collect and ship samples at no charge for research purposes – please check with your veterinarian.

Please Note:
The buccal swab kit and/or blood sample you submit is for participation in a research study only.
This research does NOT test to verify if your dog does or does not have the disease.
All sample submissions are kept confidential and results for individual dogs will NOT be made available.

 

Addison’s Project

Breeds under study for this project: Bearded Collie, Great Dane, Leonberger, Portuguese Water Dog, Standard Poodle, West Highland White Terrier

Epilepsy Project

Breeds under study for this project: Belgian Tervuren, Belgian Sheepdog, English Mastiff, Giant Schnauzer, Miniature Poodle, Standard Poodle, Toy Poodle

SLO Project

Breeds under study for this project: Bearded Collie

A Note Regarding Submission of Blood Samples

  • Although we continue to collect DNA from buccal swab samples, newer research technologies prefer DNA extracted from blood samples. Thus, we are seeking blood samples from affected and unaffected dogs. Affected dogs with veterinary diagnosis can be submitted from dogs of any age. We also need samples from dogs over the age of 7 years (the older, the better) who are free from the disease under study.
  • There is no fee for participating in this study although the owner bears the cost of blood collection and shipping of the sample to the laboratory. Some veterinarians may collect and ship samples at no charge for research purposes – please check with your veterinarian. 
  • In the event that your dog’s DNA from the blood sample is used directly in the development of a commercially available diagnostic test developed by this laboratory, the results of the test for that dog will be provided at no cost upon your written request following the availability of that commercial test.
  • If you would prefer to only submit a buccal swab sample, please click here, otherwise download the blood sample submission instructions above.
  • Please note UC Davis Campus Holidays and Closures when sending a blood sample.

Forms

Publications

Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Multiple Linked Genetic Variants on Canine Chromosome 12 Associated with Risk for Symmetrical Lupoid Onychodystrophy (SLO) in the Bearded Collie.
Gershony LC, Belanger JM, Hytönen MK, Lohi H, Oberbauer AM.
Genes (Basel). 2021 Aug 19;12(8):1265. doi: 10.3390/genes12081265.

Enhancing student scientific literacy through participation in citizen science focused on companion animal behavior.
A M Oberbauer, E Lai, N A Kinsey, T R Famula. Translational Animal Science. 2021 Aug. https://doi.org/10.1093/tas/txab131

Association analysis of dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3) variants with risk for seizures and aggression in Border Collies.
Van Buren SL, Oberbauer AM, Minor KM, Belanger JM, Furrow E.
Anim Genet. 2021 Aug;52(4):573-574. doi: 10.1111/age.13097. Epub 2021 Jun 3.

Hereditary Considerations in Pet-Specific Care for the Veterinary Team. Lowell Ackerman DVM, DACVD, MBA, MPA, CVA, MRCVS, Emma Goodman Milne BVSc, MRCVS, Jerold S. Bell DVM, Anita M. Oberbauer PhD, Jason C. Nicholas BVETMED (Hons), Nan Boss DVM, Ryane E. Englar DVM, DABVP (CANINE AND FELINE PRACTICE), Tamara Grubb DVM, PhD, DACVAA, Patricia Dowling DVM, MSc, DACVIM (LAIM), DACVCP, Kara M. Burns MS, MEd, LVT, VTS (Nutrition), D. J. Haeussler Jr. BS, MS, DVM, DACVO. 19 March 2021. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119540687.ch3

Amino Acids in Dog Nutrition and Health. Oberbauer AM, Larsen JA. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2021;1285:199-216.

Genetic characterization of Addison’s disease in Bearded Collies. Gershony LC, Belanger JM, Hytönen MK, Lohi H, Famula TR, Oberbauer AM.BMC Genomics. 2020 Nov 26;21(1):833.

Review of the Current State of Genetic Testing – A Living Resource. Prepared by Liza Gershony, DVM, PhD and Anita Oberbauer, PhD, University of California, Davis with Editorial input by Leigh Anne Clark, PhD, Clemson University. AKC Canine Health Foundation. July 2020.

Genome-wide association analysis of idiopathic epilepsy in the Belgian shepherd. J.M. Belanger, T.R. Famula, L.C. Gershony, M.K. Palij & A.M. Oberbauer. Canine Genet Epidemiol 7, 12 (2020).

Heritability of Unilateral Elbow Dysplasia in the Dog: A Retrospective Study of Sire and Dam Influence. Baers G, Keller GG, Famula TR, Oberbauer AM. Front Vet Sci. 2019 Nov 22;6:422.

A Review of the Impact of Neuter Status on Expression of Inherited Conditions in Dogs.  Oberbauer AM, Belanger JM, Famula TR. Front Vet Sci. 2019 Nov 13;6:397.

Novel Locus Associated with Symmetrical Lupoid Onychodystrophy in the Bearded Collie. Gershony LC, Belanger JM, Hytönen MK, Lohi H, Oberbauer AM. Genes (Basel). 2019 Aug 22;10(9).

Heritability and complex segregation analysis of diabetes mellitus in American Eskimo Dogs. Cai SV, Famula TR, Oberbauer AM, Hess RS. J Vet Intern Med. 2019 Sep;33(5):1926-1934.

DLA class II risk haplotypes for autoimmune diseases in the bearded collie offer insight to autoimmunity signatures across dog breeds. Gershony LC, Belanger JM, Short AD, Le M, Hytönen MK, Lohi H, Famula TR, Kennedy LJ, Oberbauer AM. Canine Genet Epidemiol. 2019 Feb 15;6:2.

Maternal omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on offspring hip joint conformation. Oberbauer AM, Daniels R, Levy K, Famula TR, Mundell P, Kelley R. PLoS One. 2018 Aug 9;13.

Individual signatures and environmental factors shape skin microbiota in healthy dogs. Cuscó A, Belanger JM, Gershony L, Islas-Trejo A, Levy K, Medrano JF, Sánchez A, Oberbauer AM, Francino O. Microbiome. 2017 Oct 13;5(1):139.

Correlation of neuter status and expression of heritable disorders. Belanger JM, Bellumori TP, Bannasch DL, Famula TR, Oberbauer AM. Canine Genet Epidemiol. 2017 May 26;4:6

Long-term genetic selection reduced prevalence of hip and elbow dysplasia in 60 dog breeds. Oberbauer AM, Keller GG, Famula TR. PLoS One. 2017 Feb 24;12(2):e0172918.

Gonadectomy effects on the risk of immune disorders in the dog: a retrospective study. Sundburg CR, Belanger JM, Bannasch DL, Famula TR, Oberbauer AM. BMCVet Res. 2016 Dec 8;12(1):278.

Protein expression and genetic variability of canine Can f 1 in golden and Labrador retriever service dogs. Breitenbuecher C, Belanger JM, Levy K, Mundell P, Fates V, Gershony L, Famula TR, Oberbauer AM. Canine Genet Epidemiol. 2016 Apr 22;3:3.

Ten inherited disorders in purebred dogs by functional breed groupings. Oberbauer AM, Belanger JM, Bellumori T, Bannasch DL, Famula TR. Canine Genet Epidemiol. 2015 Jul 11;2:9.

Identification of a common risk haplotype for canine idiopathic epilepsy in the ADAM23 gene. Koskinen LL, Seppälä EH, Belanger JM, Arumilli M, Hakosalo O, Jokinen P, Nevalainen EM, Viitmaa R, Jokinen TS, Oberbauer AM, Lohi H. BMC Genomics. 2015 Jun 18;16:465.

Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation of wolves (Canis lupus) in Southeast Alaska and comparison with wolves, dogs, and coyotes in North America. Cronin MA, Cánovas A, Bannasch DL, Oberbauer AM, Medrano JF. J Hered. 2015 Jan-Feb;106(1):26-36.

Differences in behavior and activity associated with a poly(a) expansion in the dopamine transporter in Belgian Malinois. Lit L, Belanger JM, Boehm D, Lybarger N, Oberbauer AM. PLoS One. 2013 Dec 23;8(12):e82948.

Inherited epilepsy in dogs. Ekenstedt KJ, Oberbauer AM. Top Companion Anim Med. 2013 May;28(2):51-8.

Characterization of a dopamine transporter polymorphism and behavior in Belgian Malinois.
Lit L, Belanger JM, Boehm D, Lybarger N, Haverbeke A, Diederich C, Oberbauer AM. BMC Genet. 2013 May 30;14:45.

Prevalence of inherited disorders among mixed-breed and purebred dogs: 27,254 cases (1995-2010). Bellumori TP, Famula TR, Bannasch DL, Belanger JM, Oberbauer AM.J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2013 Jun 1;242(11):1549-55.

Dopamine transporter single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Belgian Malinois dogs. Lit L, Belanger JM, Boehm D, Lybarger N, Oberbauer AM. Anim Genet. 2013 Apr 9.

Neutering dogs: effects on joint disorders and cancers in golden retrievers. Torres de la Riva G, Hart BL, Farver TB, Oberbauer AM, Messam LL, Willits N, Hart LA. PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e55937.

Identification of a Novel Idiopathic Epilepsy Locus in Belgian Shepherd Dogs. Seppälä EH, Koskinen LL, Gulløv CH, Jokinen P, Karlskov-Mortensen P, Bergamasco L, Baranowska Körberg I, Cizinauskas S, Oberbauer AM, Berendt M, Fredholm M, Lohi H. PLoS One. 2012;7(3):e33549.

Comparison of buccal and blood-derived canine DNA, either native or whole genome amplified, for array-based genome-wide association studies. Rincon G, Tengvall K, Belanger JM, Lagoutte L, Medrano JF, André C, Thomas A, Lawley CT, Hansen MS, Lindblad-Toh K, Oberbauer AM. BMC Res Notes. 2011 Jun 30;4:226.

Handler beliefs affect scent detection dog outcomes. Lit L, Schweitzer JB, Oberbauer AM.Anim Cogn. 2011 May;14(3):387-94.

Certification testing as an acute naturalistic stressor for disaster dog handlers. Lit L, Boehm D, Marzke S, Schweitzer J, Oberbauer AM. Stress. 2010 Sep;13(5):392-401.

Genome-wide linkage scan for loci associated with epilepsy in Belgian shepherd dogs. Oberbauer AM, Belanger, JM Grossman DI, Regan, KR, Famula TR. BMC Genet. 2010 May 4;11:35.

Characterization of human-dog social interaction using owner report. Lit L, Schweitzer JB, Oberbauer AM. Behav Processes. 2010 Jul;84(3):721-5.

Association of a dog leukocyte antigen class II haplotype with hypoadrenocorticism in Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers. Hughes AM, Jokinen P, Bannasch DL, Lohi H, Oberbauer AM. Tissue Antigens. 2010 Jun;75(6):684-90.

Owner reports of attention, activity, and impulsivity in dogs: a replication study. Lit L, Schweitzer JB, Iosif AM, Oberbauer AM. Behav Brain Funct. 2010 Jan 4;6:1.

Examination of candidate genes for hypoadrenocorticism in Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers. Hughes AM, Bannasch DL, Kellett K, Oberbauer AM. Vet J. 2011 Feb;187(2):212-6.

Canine fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 sequence is conserved across dogs of divergent skeletal size. Smith LB, Bannasch DL, Young AE, Grossman DI, Belanger JM, Oberbauer AM. BMC Genet. 2008 Oct 21;9:67.

Inheritance of cataracts and primary lens luxation in Jack Russell Terriers. Oberbauer AM, Hollingsworth SR, Belanger JM, Regan KR, Famula TR. Am J Vet Res. 2008 Feb;69(2):222-7.

Genetic evaluation of Addison’s disease in the Portuguese Water Dog. Oberbauer AM, Bell JS, Belanger JM, Famula TR. BMC Vet Res. 2006 May 2;2(1):15

Alternatives to blood as a source of DNA for large-scale scanning studies of canine genome linkages. Oberbauer AM, Grossman DI, Eggleston ML, Irion DN, Schaffer AL, Pedersen NC, Belanger JM. Vet Res Commun. 2003 Jan;27(1):27-38.

Heritability and complex segregation analysis of hypoadrenocorticism in the standard poodle. Famula TR, Belanger JM, Oberbauer AM. J Small Anim Pract. 2003 Jan;44(1):8-12.

The genetics of epilepsy in the belgian tervuren and sheepdog. Oberbauer AM, Grossman DI, Irion DN, Schaffer AL, Eggleston ML, Famula TR. J Hered. 2003 Jan-Feb;94(1):57-63.

Inheritance of hypoadrenocorticism in bearded collies. Oberbauer AM, Benemann KS, Belanger JM, Wagner DR, Ward JH, Famula TR. Am J Vet Res. 2002 May;63(5):643-7.

Gender effects in hearing loss in Dalmatians. Famula TR, Oberbauer AM, Williams DC. Prev Vet Med. 2001 Jan 17;48(1):15-24.

Segregation analysis of epilepsy in the Belgian tervueren dog. Famula TR, Oberbauer AM. Vet Rec. 2000 Aug 19;147(8):218-21.

Complex segregation analysis of deafness in Dalmatians. Famula TR, Oberbauer AM, Sousa CA. Am J Vet Res. 2000 May;61(5):550-3.

Reducing the incidence of epileptic seizures in the Belgian Tervuren through selection. Famula TR, Oberbauer AM. Prev Vet Med. 1998 Jan;33(1-4):251-9.

Heritability of epileptic seizures in the Belgian tervueren. Famula TR, Oberbauer AM, Brown KN. J Small Anim Pract. 1997 Aug;38(8):349-52.

A threshold model analysis of deafness in Dalmatians. Famula TR, Oberbauer AM, Sousa CA. Mamm Genome. 1996 Sep;7(9):650-3.

Glossary of Genetic Terms

Addison’s Disease (Hypoadrenocorticism)
A deficient secretion of both glucocorticoids and mineralcorticoids from the adrenal cortex. The cause is unknown, but in most cases, there appears to be an immune mediated destruction of the adrenal gland.  Symptoms include inappetance, vomiting, lethargy and weakness. An ACTH stimulation test can be used for diagnosis. The test is an evaluation of the ability of the adrenal gland to secrete cortisol.  Affected dogs show low cortisol concentrations, and no increase in cortisol following the ACTH test. Treatment includes fluid therapy, replacement of glucocorticoids and mineralcorticoids, and hormone therapy.

Autosomal
Phenotypic trait or gene NOT associated with either the X or Y sex chromosome; i.e., not sex-linked.

Congenital
Existing at or before birth resulting from hereditary or environmental influences.

Epilepsy
A condition involving recurrent seizures, which are convulsions caused by abnormal bursts of electrical activity in the brain. Seizures may last from seconds to minutes, and may include jerking of the limbs, anxiety, salivating, vocalizing, and loss of bodily functions (urinating/defecating).   Epilepsy can be caused by metabolic disorders, infectious diseases, brain injury, toxins, or brain tumors. In dogs, idiopathic (or inherited) epilepsy refers to a genetic seizure condition of unknown cause. Since a dog with idiopathic epilepsy shows no recognizable abnormalities, it is assumed to be an inherited condition in most breeds and has been demonstrated to be heritable in some breeds.  Treatment of seizures is usually two-fold which includes treatment of the underlying problem (infection, tumor, injury) and reducing or eliminating the seizure episodes with anticonvulsant medication.

Genome
Complete set of chromosomes carried in a cell.

Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS)
A genetic examination using SNPs to see if a genetic variant associated with a specific trait exists among different individuals.  A comparison of DNA from two different groups, for example, dogs with the disease (cases) and dogs without the disease (controls).

Gibbs sampling
Method of calculating the genetic merit of dogs that takes advantage of fast computers. The process itself is just a computer-based method for integrating a function without having to find the antiderivative.

Idiopathic
Arising spontaneously with no obvious external cause (e.g., genetic as opposed to trauma-induced).

Locus (plural – loci)
Site or position on a chromosome where a particular gene or DNA sequence resides. Often used interchangeably with the term ‘gene’, but locus is more generic.

Microsatellite
As used here, a region of the DNA that can be consistently identified, using a laboratory procedure, across all individuals in a single breed. Microsatellites themselves are repetitive DNA sequences that are randomly distributed throughout the mammalian genome, tend to be highly polymorphic, and are short DNA segments.

Phenotype
The observable characteristics or traits of an individual.

Polygenic
Phenotypic trait whose expression is controlled by, or associated with, more than one gene.

Polymorphic
Presence of several common, alternate forms of a genetic characteristic in a population.

Recessive
Trait that requires two mutant copies of the gene (i.e., alleles) in order for the disorder to be expressed; must be homozygous for the mutant allele.

SNPs
Single nucleotide polymorphisms, pronounced “snips”, are DNA sequence variations that occur when a single nucleotide (A,T,C,or G) in the genome sequence is altered.

Symmetrical Lupoid Onychodystrophy (SLO)
SLO is a disorder in Bearded Collies, as well as other breeds, that causes loss of toenails. The age of onset is typically between 3-8 years of age affecting 1-2 nails and eventually progressing to all nails. SLO requires lifelong fatty acid supplementation.

Trait
A distinguishing quality or characteristic of an individual, such as hair color or eye color.

Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS)
WGS is the process of determining the complete DNA sequence (genome) of the dog at one time. The dog genome contains 38 autosomal chromosomes with approximately 2.5 billion DNA base pairs with over 6 million variants (SNPs). A comparison of genome sequences from cases and controls can be used to identify causative variants associated with disease. WGS generates large amounts of data making the analysis process very tedious.

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Send your check made payable to “UC Regents” (in the memo portion of the check write Canine Genetic Analysis Project):

Department of Animal Science
Attn: Anita Oberbauer
University of California
2251 Meyer Hall
450 Bioletti Way
Davis, CA  95616-8521

Foundations and Organizations

In addition to the many individuals who have generously supported our research, we thank the following foundations and organizations:

The Addison’s work is a collaborative study between UC Davis, Åke Hedhammar from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) and Kerstin Lindblad-Toh from Uppsala Univeristy, Sweden and the Broad Institute of Harvard, Cambridge.

The Epilepsy work is a collaborative study between UC Davis and Hannes Lohi from the University of Helsinki, Finland.

The SLO work is sponsored by BeaCon For Health:The Bearded Collie Foundation for Health.

 

Thank You

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